Product

CSII Product Concept

Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) pump therapy improves blood glucose control and lifestyle flexibility as compared to multiple-daily insulin injections. Yet less than half of people with type 1 diabetes currently use a pump and fewer use a companion continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensor. More convenient, reliable systems are needed to realize the promise of an artificial pancreas that reduces the daily burden of diabetes.

People on CSII pump therapy change their infusion set every third day, over one hundred times per year. Capillary’s novel set is designed to reduce the burden of managing diabetes by:

Reducing the frequency of infusion failure and unexpected hyperglycemia;

Providing a more predictable insulin response across each and every mealtime bolus;

Preserving infusion sites with less tissue scarring;

Extending infusion set wear time from three to seven or more days, matching insulin reservoir and CGM sensor lifetimes;

Improving blood glucose control with a lower incidence of hypoglycemia.

First-generation Artificial Pancreas System integrating Insulin Pump and Continuous Glucose Monitor

InsulinAbsorption_5

CSII catheter with multiple holes infusing insulin across many tissue layers

Capillary Biomedical, Inc. is developing an infusion set that doesn’t kink when inserted and that works reliably day-to-day. Multiple holes distribute insulin to a larger volume of subcutaneous tissue than traditional sets. Reliable access to more capillary blood and lymph vessels results in more consistent absorption with a more predictable effect on blood glucose levels.

CAUTION –­­ Investigational device. Limited by United States law to investigational use.

“The design is somewhat similar to a soaker hose or sprinkler needle. Distributing insulin into a larger volume and surface area of subcutaneous tissue provides access to more capillary and lymph vessels, resulting in more rapid and consistent absorption and a faster mealtime insulin response with a more predictable effect on blood glucose levels.”

Jeffrey I. Joseph, D.O.
Professor of Anesthesiology at Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University

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